Impact of genetic engineering on downstream processing of proteins produced in E. coli

  • S. -O. Enfors
  • H. Hellebust
  • K. Köhler
  • L. Strandberg
  • A. Veide
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/BFb0009078

Part of the Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology book series (ABE, volume 43)
Cite this paper as:
Enfors S.O., Hellebust H., Köhler K., Strandberg L., Veide A. (1990) Impact of genetic engineering on downstream processing of proteins produced in E. coli. In: Applied Molecular Genetics. Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology, vol 43. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Genetic engineering can be used to give a protein properties that are advantageous for downstream processing. Many heterologous proteins are degraded at high rates by proteases. Depending on which type of proteolytic degradation is encountered the strategy may be different: induction of inclusion bodies, change of the amino acid sequence in the sensitive site of the product, or protection by fusion of the product with other proteins. The number of unit operations needed to purify a protein may be reduced by addition of other polypeptides or amino acids to the product. Affinity chromatography, immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, and extraction in aqueous two-phase systems are unit operations which can be made more versatile by the fusion technique.

List of Symbols and Abbreviations

Ala

Alanine

Arg

Arginine

Asn

Asparagine

Asp

Aspartic acid

DHFR

Dihydrofolate reductase

E. coli

Escherichia coli

Gly

Glycine

His

Histidine

IFN

Interferon

IGF

Human insulin-like growth factor

IgG

Immunoglobulin G

IL

Interleukin

kDa

1000 dalton

NTA

nitilotriacetate

ompT

outer membrane protein T

PEG

poly (ethylene) glycol

rDNA

recombinant DNA

Ser

Serine

SpA

Staphylococcal protein A

ZZ

artifical IgG-binding protein derived from staphylococcal protein A

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. -O. Enfors
    • 1
  • H. Hellebust
    • 1
  • K. Köhler
    • 1
  • L. Strandberg
    • 1
  • A. Veide
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and BiotechnologyThe Royal Institute of TechnologyStockholmSweden

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