Chapter

Publishing Higher Degree Research

Part of the series Higher Education Horizons pp 25-32

Mobile Learning Congruencies with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Cultural Philosophies

  • Philip TownsendAffiliated withCRC-REP/Remote, Education Systems Project, Flinders University
  • , John R. HalseyAffiliated withRural Education and Communities, Flinders University
  • , John GuentherAffiliated withCRC-REP/Remote, Education Systems Project, Flinders University

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

There has been a rapid and extensive uptake of mobile phones in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, regardless of mobile phone coverage or Internet access (Brady et al., 2008; Featherstone, 2011). Kral (2014, p. 6f) stated “people, predominantly young people, [are] buying laptops, mobile phones and even iPads or Tablets”. Recent figures indicate Australia wide, 70% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people own a smartphone, and in remote communities 43% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people own a smartphone (MIR, 2014). What fosters and nurtures this embracing of mobile technologies?