Origins of the 《Social State》 in German Philosophy and 《Staatswissenschaft》

  • Stefan Koslowski
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-60652-6_8

Part of the Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy book series (SEEP)
Cite this paper as:
Koslowski S. (1997) Origins of the 《Social State》 in German Philosophy and 《Staatswissenschaft》. In: Koslowski P., Føllesdal A. (eds) Restructuring the Welfare State. Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

In Germany, the origins of the 《Social State》 can be traced back to three different intellectual traditions: the socialist ideal of a transparent rational community of workers is as fundamental to it as are conservative defensive strategies against the social revolution. Standing alongside these sources have been, from the very beginning, deeply-rooted ideas of the 《Caritas》 of “Christian personalism.” These superficially contradictory basic concepts came together for the first time in today’s welfare state, based on the German constitution: the modern-day welfare state presupposes the acceptance of state and society as two forms of organisation, autonomous in principle, for the political and economic co-ordination of the human community (H. Zacher).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Koslowski

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