A Reasonable Expectation of Privacy? Secrecy and National Security in a Democracy

  • Kathleen M. Hogan
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-39345-7_25

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8030)
Cite this paper as:
Hogan K.M. (2013) A Reasonable Expectation of Privacy? Secrecy and National Security in a Democracy. In: Marinos L., Askoxylakis I. (eds) Human Aspects of Information Security, Privacy, and Trust. HAS 2013. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 8030. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Citizens do not routinely agree to sacrifice their privacy. When cases come to light that the government has been spying on its citizens, there is outrage. Still, citizens’ fierce protection of personal privacy does not obviate their expectation of government to ensure national security. Public support for secret government operations is cyclical, self-interested, influenced by citizens’ knowledge of political affairs, and related to the public’s level of trust in its leaders and the perception of threats. Polls indicate that citizens are protective of their personal privacy but willing to give up a degree of control to trusted leaders.

Keywords

Secrecy privacy public opinion polls about national security government public preferences 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen M. Hogan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MarylandMarylandUSA

Personalised recommendations