Socially Optimized Learning in Virtual Environments (SOLVE)

  • Lynn C. Miller
  • Stacy Marsella
  • Teresa Dey
  • Paul Robert Appleby
  • John L. Christensen
  • Jennifer Klatt
  • Stephen J. Read
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-25289-1_20

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7069)
Cite this paper as:
Miller L.C. et al. (2011) Socially Optimized Learning in Virtual Environments (SOLVE). In: Si M., Thue D., André E., Lester J.C., Tanenbaum J., Zammitto V. (eds) Interactive Storytelling. ICIDS 2011. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 7069. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Although young men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk for contracting HIV, few interventions address the affective/automatic factors (e.g., sexual arousal, shame/stigma) that may precipitate young MSM’s risk-taking. A National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded DVD interactive video intervention that simulated a “virtual date” with guides/mentors reduced sexual risk over 3-months for Black, Latino and Caucasian young MSM. In the current work, limitations of the DVD format (e.g., number of different risk challenges MSM encounter; DVD quickly becomes dated) were addressed with 3-D animated intelligent agents/interactive digital storytelling using a Unity Game platform. The development (e.g., design, art, social science formative research, etc.) of this NIH funded game for changing risky behavior is described as well as the ongoing national randomized “on-line” evaluation over 6 months.

Keywords

Virtual Characters and Agents Narrativity in Games Games for Health HIV Prevention Intelligent Agents PsychSim 3-D Animated Characters Interactive Digital Storytelling (IDS) SOLVE 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynn C. Miller
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stacy Marsella
    • 3
  • Teresa Dey
    • 3
  • Paul Robert Appleby
    • 1
    • 4
  • John L. Christensen
    • 2
  • Jennifer Klatt
    • 5
  • Stephen J. Read
    • 2
  1. 1.Annenberg School for Communication and JournalismUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Institute for Creative TechnologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of Pediatrics (CHLA), Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  5. 5.University of Duisburg-EssenDuisburg-EssenGermany

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