Comparing the dynamics of stomatal networks to the problem-solving dynamics of cellular computers

  • Jevin D. West
  • David Peak
  • Keith Mott
  • Susanna Messinger
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-17635-7_40

Cite this paper as:
West J.D., Peak D., Mott K., Messinger S. (2011) Comparing the dynamics of stomatal networks to the problem-solving dynamics of cellular computers. In: Minai A.A., Braha D., Bar-Yam Y. (eds) Unifying Themes in Complex Systems. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Is the adaptive response to environmental stimuli of a biological system lacking a central nervous system a result of a formal computation? If so, these biological systems must conform to a different set of computational rules than those associated with central processing. To explore this idea, we examined the dynamics of stomatal patchiness in leaves. Stomata—tiny pores on the surface of a leaf—are biological processing units that a plant uses to solve an optimization problem—maximize CO2 assimilation and minimize H2O loss. Under some conditions, groups of stomata coordinate in both space and time producing motile patches that can be visualized with chlorophyll fluorescence. These patches suggest that stomata are nonautonomous and that they form a network presumably engaged in the optimization task. In this study, we show that stomatal dynamics are statistically and qualitatively comparable to the emergent, collective, problem-solving dynamics of cellular computing systems.

Keywords

Stomata Networks Distributed Computation Complex Systems Stomatal Networks 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jevin D. West
    • 1
  • David Peak
    • 2
  • Keith Mott
    • 3
  • Susanna Messinger
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of BiologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsUtah State UniversityLoganUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiologyUtah State UniversityLoganUSA
  4. 4.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA