Efficient Data Collection and Event Boundary Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Tiny Models

  • Kraig King
  • Silvia Nittel
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-15300-6_8

Volume 6292 of the book series Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS)
Cite this paper as:
King K., Nittel S. (2010) Efficient Data Collection and Event Boundary Detection in Wireless Sensor Networks Using Tiny Models. In: Fabrikant S.I., Reichenbacher T., van Kreveld M., Schlieder C. (eds) Geographic Information Science. GIScience 2010. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 6292. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Using wireless geosensor networks (WGSN), sensor nodes often monitor a phenomenon that is both continuous in time and space. However, sensor nodes take discrete samples, and an analytical framework inside or outside the WSN is used to analyze the phenomenon. In both cases, expensive communication is used to stream a large number of data samples to other nodes and to the base station. In this work, we explore a novel alternative that utilizes predictive process knowledge of the observed phenomena to minimize upstream communication. Often, observed phenomena adhere to a process with predictable behavior over time. We present a strategy for developing and running so-called ’tiny models’ on individual sensor nodes that capture the predictable behavior of the phenomenon; nodes now only communicate when unexpected events are observed. Using multiple simulations, we demonstrate that a significant percentage of messages can be reduced during data collection.

Keywords

Sensors wireless sensor network model continuous phenomenon tiny models process modeling prediction autonomous 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kraig King
    • 1
    • 2
  • Silvia Nittel
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Geosensor Networks Laboratory 
  2. 2.Department of Spatial Information Science and EngineeringUniversity of MaineOrono MaineUnited States