Chapter

Frontiers in Materials Research

Volume 10 of the series Advances in Materials Research pp 29-47

Measurements and Mechanisms of Single-Molecule Conductance Switching

  • A. M. MooreAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University
  • , B. A. MantoothAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State UniversityAMSRD-ECB-RT-PD, Edgewood Chemical Biological Center
  • , A. A. DameronAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State UniversityDynamic Organic Light, Inc.
  • , Z. J. DonhauserAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State UniversityVassar College
  • , P. A. LewisAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State UniversityAmerican Chemical Society
  • , R. K. SmithAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State UniversityMaterials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • , D. J. FuchsAffiliated withInstitute for Materials Research, Tohoku UniversityDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State UniversityEdwards Vacuum, Inc.
  • , P. S. WeissAffiliated withDepartment of Chemistry, Department of Physics, The Pennsylvania State University

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Summary

We have engineered and analyzed oligo(phenylene-ethynylene) (OPE) derivatives to understand and to control the bistable conductance switching exhibited by these molecules when inserted into saturated alkanethiolate and amidecontaining alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au{111}. By engineering the structures of the OPE derivatives, we have shown conductance switching to depend on hybridization changes at the molecule–substrate interface. In addition, we have demonstrated bias-dependent switching controlled by interactions between the dipole of the OPEs and the electric field applied between the scanning tunneling microscope tip and the substrate. These interactions are stabilized via intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the OPEs and host amide-containing SAMs.