Chapter

Comprehensive Healthcare Simulation: Pediatrics

Part of the series Comprehensive Healthcare Simulation pp 291-298

Date:

Simulation for Teaching Communication Skills

  • Jennifer R. ReidAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital Email author 
  • , Kimberly P. StoneAffiliated withDepartment of Pediatrics, Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital
  • , Elaine C. MeyerAffiliated withDepartment of Psychiatry, Institute for Professionalism and Ethical Practice, Harvard Medical School, Boston Children’s Hospital

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Abstract

Healthcare communication, consisting of conversations between healthcare providers and with patients and families, is ubiquitous and not always done well. Conveying both factual content and managing the emotional aspect of a conversation takes skill and practice. In this chapter, the components of a healthcare conversation are introduced, as well as several examples of how simulation has been used for healthcare communication training These examples range from the straightforward encounter, the introduction of oneself, to the more complex conversation, such as disclosing a medical error. This can be particularly challenging in pediatrics, where one may have to communicate simultaneously with a child, of varying developmental levels, as well as a parent or multiple family members who are each in their own emotional state. A review of how simulation can be used to prepare providers to communicate with other healthcare providers, specific patient populations, adolescents, family members, and mental health patients is presented, as well as a discussion on how different simulation modalities can be used to create more realistic conversations.

Keywords

Communication Conversations Introductions Difficult conversations Program to enhance relational and communication skills Obtaining a medical history Handoffs Consultation SBAR Informed consent Delivering bad news Disclosing medical errors Confederates Patient actors Adolescents