Mitigating Cognitive Bias through the Use of Serious Games: Effects of Feedback

  • Norah E. Dunbar
  • Matthew L. Jensen
  • Claude H. Miller
  • Elena Bessarabova
  • Sara K. Straub
  • Scott N. Wilson
  • Javier Elizondo
  • Judee K. Burgoon
  • Joseph S. Valacich
  • Bradley Adame
  • Yu-Hao Lee
  • Brianna Lane
  • Cameron Piercy
  • David Wilson
  • Shawn King
  • Cindy Vincent
  • Ryan Scheutzler
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-07127-5_9

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 8462)
Cite this paper as:
Dunbar N.E. et al. (2014) Mitigating Cognitive Bias through the Use of Serious Games: Effects of Feedback. In: Spagnolli A., Chittaro L., Gamberini L. (eds) Persuasive Technology. PERSUASIVE 2014. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 8462. Springer, Cham

Abstract

A serious video game was created to teach players about cognitive bias and encourage mitigation of both confirmation bias and the fundamental attribution error. Multiplayer and single-player versions of the game were created to test the effect of different feedback sources on bias mitigation performance. A total of 626 participants were randomly assigned to play the single player/multiplayer game once or repeatedly. The results indicate the single player game was superior at reducing confirmation bias and that repeated plays and plays of longer duration were more effective at mitigating both biases than a control condition where participants watched a training video.

Keywords

Cognitive bias Confirmation bias Feedback Fundamental Attribution error Serious Games 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norah E. Dunbar
    • 1
  • Matthew L. Jensen
    • 2
  • Claude H. Miller
    • 1
  • Elena Bessarabova
    • 1
  • Sara K. Straub
    • 1
  • Scott N. Wilson
    • 3
  • Javier Elizondo
    • 3
  • Judee K. Burgoon
    • 4
  • Joseph S. Valacich
    • 4
  • Bradley Adame
    • 5
  • Yu-Hao Lee
    • 1
  • Brianna Lane
    • 1
  • Cameron Piercy
    • 1
  • David Wilson
    • 4
  • Shawn King
    • 1
  • Cindy Vincent
    • 6
  • Ryan Scheutzler
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Communication and Center for Applied Social ResearchUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA
  2. 2.Price College of Business and Center for Applied Social ResearchUniversity of OklahomaUSA
  3. 3.K20 CenterUniversity of Oklahoma.NormanUSA
  4. 4.Center for the Management of InformationUniversity of Arizona, McClelland HallTucsonUSA
  5. 5.Hugh Downs School of CommunicationArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  6. 6.Department of CommunicationSalem State UniversitySalemUSA

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