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OpenSHMEM and Related Technologies. Experiences, Implementations, and Tools

Volume 8356 of the series Lecture Notes in Computer Science pp 149-162

OpenSHMEM Extensions and a Vision for Its Future Direction

  • Stephen PooleAffiliated withExtreme Scale Systems Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • , Pavel ShamisAffiliated withExtreme Scale Systems Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • , Aaron WelchAffiliated withComputer Science Department, University of Houston
  • , Swaroop PophaleAffiliated withComputer Science Department, University of Houston
  • , Manjunath Gorentla VenkataAffiliated withExtreme Scale Systems Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • , Oscar HernandezAffiliated withExtreme Scale Systems Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • , Gregory KoenigAffiliated withExtreme Scale Systems Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • , Tony CurtisAffiliated withComputer Science Department, University of Houston
  • , Chung-Hsing HsuAffiliated withExtreme Scale Systems Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

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Abstract

The Extreme Scale Systems Center (ESSC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), together with the University of Houston, led the effort to standardize the SHMEM API with input from the vendors and user community. In 2012, OpenSHMEM specification 1.0 was finalized and released to the OpenSHMEM community for comments. As we move to future HPC systems, there are several shortcomings in the current specification that we need to address to ensure scalability, higher degrees of concurrency, locality, thread safety, fault-tolerance, parallel I/O capabilities, etc. In this paper we discuss an immediate set of extensions that we propose to the current API and our vision for a future API, OpenSHMEM Next-Generation (NG), that targets future Exascale systems. We also explain our rational for the proposed extensions and highlight the lessons learned from other PGAS languages and communication libraries.