Spatial contrast sensitivity and visual accommodation studied with VEP (Visual Evoked Potential), PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and psychophysical techniques

  • Ove Franzén
  • Gunnar Lennerstrand
  • José Pardo
  • Hans Richter
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-0348-7586-8_9

Cite this paper as:
Franzén O., Lennerstrand G., Pardo J., Richter H. (2000) Spatial contrast sensitivity and visual accommodation studied with VEP (Visual Evoked Potential), PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and psychophysical techniques. In: Franzén O., Richter H., Stark L. (eds) Accommodation and Vergence Mechanisms in the Visual System. Birkhäuser, Basel

Summary

Psychophysical scales of a 3,3 c/deg monochromatic checkerboard of variable contrast were compared with steady state visually evoked potentials (VEP) recorded by gross electrodes on the scalp. These estimates of neuronal population responses grew as a power function of physical contrast having an exponent of approximately the same magnitude as the corresponding psychophysical function which gives credence to the validity of the procedures employed. The functional neuroimaging technique of positron emission tomography (PET), based on radioactive decay of a labelled tracer occurring inside the brain, was applied in normal subjects to quantitatively explore the influence of voluntary positive accommodation and also to examine the effect of reduced contrast sensitivity in human strabismic amblyopia. A great asymmetry in metabolic activity was observed in the striate cortex, that is, the Brodmann area 17 (BA 17) activation was strongest contralateral to the dominant viewing eye. The PET scans revealed, however, a high correlation between blood flow increases in the right striate cortex (BA 17) and the left extrastriate cortex (BA 18) during voluntary accommodation, possibly reflecting top-down modulation and reentrant processes. The poor contrast sensitivity in strabismic amblyopia could essentially be explained by deactivation of the ipsilateral extrastriate cortical areas BA 18 and BA 19.

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Copyright information

© Springer Basel AG 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ove Franzén
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Gunnar Lennerstrand
    • 1
  • José Pardo
    • 3
    • 4
  • Hans Richter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical ScienceKarolinska Institute and Huddinge University HospitalHuddingeSweden
  2. 2.Mid Sweden UniversitySundsvallSweden
  3. 3.Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Veterans Affairs Medical CenterUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  5. 5.Department of Optometry and Vision ScienceUniversity of LatviaRigaLatvia