Chapter

Diagnostic Interviewing

pp 433-454

Older Adults

  • Barry EdelsteinAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, West Virginia University
  • , Lesley KovenAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, West Virginia University
  • , Adam SpiraAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, West Virginia University
  • , Andrea Shreve-NeigerAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, West Virginia University

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Abstract

In 1999 there were 34.5 million adults aged 65 years or older in the United States (Administration on Aging, 2000). This group constituted 12.7% of the entire U.S. population. Older adults are also getting older, with individuals having a life expectancy of an additional 17.8 years once they reach the age of 65. The number of older adults is increasing at a higher rate than individuals under the age of 65. By 2030 we will have twice the number of older adults as we did in 1999, and they will represent 20% of the U.S. population.