Chapter

Conscious Mind, Sleeping Brain

pp 429-439

Dream Psychology

Operating in the Dark
  • Alan MoffittAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, Carleton University
  • , Robert HoffmannAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, Carleton University
  • , Janet MullingtonAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, City College of New York
  • , Sheila PurcellAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, Carleton University
  • , Ross PigeauAffiliated withHuman Factors, Defense and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine
  • , Roger WellsAffiliated withDepartment of Psychology, Carleton University

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Abstract

The questions we want to address concern the scientific significance of lucid dreaming, especially for our understanding of the function of dreaming. There is an emerging consensus that scientific dream psychology has not lived up to the potential that motivated much of the research following the discovery of REM sleep in 1953 (see Antrobus, 1978). Foulkes, for example (1978, 1982, 1983a,b, 1985) has claimed that the three foundation disciplines of dream psychology (psychoanalysis, psychophysiology, and evolutionary biology) have contributed very little to a scientific understanding of dreaming. Similarly, Fiss (1983, 1986) has argued that the scientific study of dreaming has failed to develop a clinically relevant psychology of dreaming.