Chapter

Functional Surfaces in Biology

pp 97-111

Dry in the Water: The Superhydrophobic Water Fern Salvinia – a Model for Biomimetic Surfaces

  • Zdenek CermanAffiliated withNees Institute for Biodiversity of Plants, Bonn University Email author 
  • , Boris F. StrifflerAffiliated withNees Institute for Biodiversity of Plants, Bonn University
  • , Wilhelm BarthlottAffiliated withNees Institute for Biodiversity of Plants, Bonn University

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Over millions of years plant surfaces evolved optimized complex multifunctional interfaces. They fulfill different functions in terrestrial plants such as limitation of uncontrolled water loss, protection against various biotic and abiotic influences, and they play a role in the attachment of insects. A recent overview on plant surface functions is presented by Jeffree (in Riederer, 2006). One of the most remarkable functions is closely linked with plant epicuticular waxes. The outermost barrier is formed by a cuticle consisting of two major components: a polyester matrix with embedded and overlaying lipids.