Chapter

SEAGRASSES: BIOLOGY, ECOLOGYAND CONSERVATION

pp 567-593

Human Impacts on Seagrasses: Eutrophication, Sedimentation, and Contamination

  • Peter J. RalphAffiliated withInstitute for Water and Environmental Resource Management, University of Technology
  • , David TomaskoAffiliated withResource Management Department, Environmental Section
  • , Kenneth MooreAffiliated withVirginia Institute of Marine Science, College of William and Mary
  • , Stephanie SeddonAffiliated withSouth Australian Research and Development Institute (Aquatic Sciences), Environment and EcologyInstitute for Water and Environmental Resource Management, University of Technology
  • , Catrionà M. O. Macinnis-NgAffiliated withInstitute for Water and Environmental Resource Management, University of Technology

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Abstract

Growth of human populations along coastal environments, as well as poor water management practices have resulted in the complete loss of seagrass meadows (Kemp et al., 1983; Larkum and West, 1990; Short and Wyllie-Echeverria, 1996; Peters et al., 1997). For example, the catastrophic loss of seagrasses clearly illustrated in Fig. 1 is linked to coastal development and associated reduction in water quality.