Chapter

Applications of Databases

Volume 819 of the series Lecture Notes in Computer Science pp 299-316

Date:

A zoomable DBMS for brain structure, function and behavior

  • J. CarlisAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , J. RiedlAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , A. GeorgopoulosAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , G. WilcoxAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , R. EldeAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , J. PardoAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , K. UgurbilAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , E. RetzelAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
  • , J. MaguireAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
    • , B. MillerAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
    • , M. ClaypoolAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
    • , T. BreljeAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer
    • , C. HondaAffiliated withScience Department and Medical School, University of Minnesota Computer

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Abstract

We have begun a long-term project to build a new kind of database and its enhanced, supporting database management system (DBMS) for international neuroscience research. Because brain research occurs world-wide, our database will be distributed, encouraging rapid, open dissemination of results to a broad audience of neuroscientists. It will conjoin information and experimental results from many disciplines. We envision a zoomable database of the brain tissue itself, in large part embedded in three dimensions (3D), through which one can “fly.” Within this coarse structure, the database will also organize fine-structural, functional and behavioral data. As often as possible, the database will express experimental data in its purest, least analyzed form, so that expensive raw data can be analyzed and reanalyzed by researchers worldwide.

We believe that our project will profoundly effect the way in which neuroscience is done, while providing key areas for database research and distributed computing.