Chapter

Telocytes

Volume 913 of the series Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology pp 287-302

Date:

Electrophysiological Features of Telocytes

  • Daniel Dumitru BanciuAffiliated withDepartment of Anatomy, Animal Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest
  • , Adela BanciuAffiliated withDepartment of Anatomy, Animal Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest
  • , Beatrice Mihaela RaduAffiliated withDepartment of Anatomy, Animal Physiology and Biophysics, Faculty of Biology, University of BucharestDepartment of Neurological and Movement Sciences, University of Verona Email author 

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Telocytes (TCs) are interstitial cells described in multiple structures, including the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, urinary tract, uterus, and heart. Several studies have indicated the possibility that TCs are involved in the pacemaker potential in these organs. It is supposed that TCs are interacting with the neighboring muscular cells and their network contributes to the initiation and propagation of the electrical potentials. In order to understand the contribution of TCs to various excitability mechanisms, it is necessary to analyze the plasma membrane proteins (e.g., ion channels) functionally expressed in these cells. So far, potassium, calcium, and chloride currents, but not sodium currents, have been described in TCs in primary cell culture from different tissues. Moreover, TCs have been described as sensors for mechanical stimuli (e.g., contraction, extension, etc.). In conclusion, TCs might play an essential role in gastrointestinal peristalsis, in respiration, in pregnant uterus contraction, or in miction, but further highlighting studies are necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms and the cell-cell interactions by which TCs contribute to the tissue excitability and pacemaker potentials initiation/propagation.

Keywords

Telocytes Interstitial cells of Cajal In vitro electrophysiology Patch clamp Potassium currents Calcium currents Chloride currents Pacemaker potential