Chapter

Sphingolipids: Basic Science and Drug Development

Volume 215 of the series Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology pp 153-166

Date:

The Role of Ceramide-1-Phosphate in Biological Functions

  • L. Alexis HoeferlinAffiliated withDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • , Dayanjan S. WijesingheAffiliated withDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • , Charles E. ChalfantAffiliated withDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Virginia Commonwealth University Email author 

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Abstract

In mammalian cells, cermide-1-phosphate (C1P) is produced via the ATP-dependent mechanism of converting ceramide to C1P by the enzyme, ceramide kinase (CERK). CERK was first described as a calcium-stimulated lipid kinase that co-purified with brain synaptic vesicles, and to date, CERK is the only identified mammalian enzyme known to produce C1P in cells. C1P has steadily emerged as a bioactive sphingolipid involved in cell proliferation, macrophage migration, and inflammatory events. The recent generation of the CERK knockout mouse and the development of CERK inhibitors have furthered our current understanding of CERK-derived C1P in regulating biological processes. In this chapter, the history of C1P as well as the biological functions attributed to C1P are reviewed.

Keywords

Ceramide kinase Ceramide-1-phosphate Eicosanoids Proliferation Immunity