Terrestrial invertebrates and climate change: Physiological and life-cycle adaptations

  • Jennifer E. L. Butterfield
  • John C. Coulson
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-60599-4_31

Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (volume 47)
Cite this paper as:
Butterfield J.E.L., Coulson J.C. (1997) Terrestrial invertebrates and climate change: Physiological and life-cycle adaptations. In: Huntley B., Cramer W., Morgan A.V., Prentice H.C., Allen J.R.M. (eds) Past and Future Rapid Environmental Changes. NATO ASI Series (Series I: Global Environmental Change), vol 47. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Invertebrates are ectotherms and their growth rates are directly dependent on environmental temperatures; being small, they are also highly susceptible to desiccation (Andrewartha & Birch 1954). Changes in temperature and rainfall régimes thus are likely to have major direct effects on invertebrate distributions. Equally important, climate change will have indirect effects through its effect on food plant distributions and phenologies. Many specialist herbivores have shifted their distributions in response to changes in plant distributions in the past (Hengeveld 1990), others must have adapted to changed timing of budburst and early leaf growth in their host plant (Dixon 1985; Murray et al . 1989).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer E. L. Butterfield
    • 1
  • John C. Coulson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of DurhamDurhamUK

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