Automating the Mentor in a Serious Game: A Discourse Analysis Using Finite State Machines

  • Brent Morgan
  • Fazel Kehtkar
  • Athur Graesser
  • David Shaffer
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-39476-8_119

Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 374)
Cite this paper as:
Morgan B., Kehtkar F., Graesser A., Shaffer D. (2013) Automating the Mentor in a Serious Game: A Discourse Analysis Using Finite State Machines. In: Stephanidis C. (eds) HCI International 2013 - Posters’ Extended Abstracts. HCI 2013. Communications in Computer and Information Science, vol 374. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Serious games are increasingly becoming a popular, effective supplement to standard classroom instruction [1]. Similar to recreational games, multi-party chat is a standard method of communication in serious games. As players collaborate in a serious game, mentoring is often needed to facilitate progress and learning [2, 3, 4]. This role is almost exclusively provided by a human at the present time. However, the cost incurred with training a human mentor represents a critical barrier for widespread use of a collaborative epistemic game. Although great strides have been made in automating one-on-one tutorial dialogues [5, 6], multi-party chat presents a significant challenge for natural language processing. The goal of this research, then, is to provide a preliminary understanding of player-mentor conversations in the context of an epistemic game, Land Science [7].

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brent Morgan
    • 1
  • Fazel Kehtkar
    • 1
  • Athur Graesser
    • 1
  • David Shaffer
    • 2
  1. 1.Psychology, Institute for Intelligent SystemsUniversity of MemphisMemphisUSA
  2. 2.University of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

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