Trade-Off Analysis of Elasticity Approaches for Cloud-Based Business Applications

  • Basem Suleiman
  • Sherif Sakr
  • Srikumar Venugopal
  • Wasim Sadiq
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-35063-4_34

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 7651)
Cite this paper as:
Suleiman B., Sakr S., Venugopal S., Sadiq W. (2012) Trade-Off Analysis of Elasticity Approaches for Cloud-Based Business Applications. In: Wang X.S., Cruz I., Delis A., Huang G. (eds) Web Information Systems Engineering - WISE 2012. WISE 2012. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 7651. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) providers, such as Amazon Web Services, offer on-demand access to computing resources at pay-as-you-go prices. The key benefit of IaaS is elasticity, i.e., the ability to provision and de-provision resources at will. This feature makes IaaS infrastructure as the best platform for hosting web applications, e.g. e-business, that are subjected to highly-variable request patterns. However, elasticity can be triggered either on the basis of resource utilization or for meeting service level objectives (SLOs). In this paper, we extensively evaluate these two types of elasticity rules using the TPC-W benchmark on Amazon IaaS infrastructure. From this experimental data, we evaluate the performance of these rules against the primary metric of service level satisfaction for web applications, and secondary metrics such as resource utilization and cost. Through our inferences, we present a number of recommendations that would enable practitioners and cloud consumers using Amazon to define appropriate elasticity rules to meet their SLOs and other metrics.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Basem Suleiman
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sherif Sakr
    • 1
  • Srikumar Venugopal
    • 1
  • Wasim Sadiq
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Computer Science & EngineeringUni. of New South WalesAustralia
  2. 2.Social Business Network Research PracticeSAP ResearchAustralia

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