Chapter

Swimming Physiology of Fish

pp 237-256

Date:

Transcriptomic and Proteomic Response of Skeletal Muscle to Swimming-Induced Exercise in Fish

  • Josep V. PlanasAffiliated withDepartament de Fisiologia i Immunologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de BarcelonaInstitut de Biomedicina de la Universitat de Barcelona (IBUB) Email author 
  • , Miguel Martín-PérezAffiliated withDepartament de Fisiologia i Immunologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona
  • , Leonardo J. MagnoniAffiliated withDepartament de Fisiologia i Immunologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de BarcelonaInstitut de Biomedicina de la Universitat de Barcelona (IBUB)
  • , Josefina BlascoAffiliated withDepartament de Fisiologia i Immunologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona
  • , Antoni IbarzAffiliated withDepartament de Fisiologia i Immunologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona
  • , Jaume Fernandez-BorrasAffiliated withDepartament de Fisiologia i Immunologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de Barcelona
  • , Arjan P. PalstraAffiliated withDepartament de Fisiologia i Immunologia, Facultat de Biologia, Universitat de BarcelonaInstitut de Biomedicina de la Universitat de Barcelona (IBUB)Institute for Marine Resources and Ecosystem Studies (IMARES), Wageningen Aquaculture, Wageningen UR

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Abstract

The “Omics” revolution has brought along the possibility to dissect complex physiological processes, such as exercise, at the gene (genomics), mRNA (transcriptomics), protein (proteomics), metabolite (metabolomics), and other levels with unprecedented detail. To date, a few studies in mammals, including humans, have approached this issue by investigating the effects of exercise on the transcriptome as well as on the proteome of skeletal muscle. In fish, however, despite the successful development and application of transcriptomic and proteomic approaches to study various physiological and pathological conditions over the last decade, no information is available on the application of transcriptomic or proteomic techniques to the study of the molecular effects of swimming-induced activity on skeletal muscle. Therefore, the aim of this chapter is to review recent data on the transcriptomic and proteomic response of white and red skeletal muscle to sustained swimming in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata), two economically important species.