Chapter

Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction

Volume 6974 of the series Lecture Notes in Computer Science pp 235-245

Multi-modal Affect Induction for Affective Brain-Computer Interfaces

  • Christian MühlAffiliated withHuman Media Interaction, University of Twente
  • , Egon L. van den BroekAffiliated withHuman Media Interaction, University of TwenteHuman-Centered Computing ConsultancyKarakter University Center, Radboud University Medical Center
  • , Anne-Marie BrouwerAffiliated withTNO Behavioural and Societal Sciences
  • , Femke NijboerAffiliated withHuman Media Interaction, University of Twente
  • , Nelleke van WouweAffiliated withTNO Behavioural and Societal Sciences
  • , Dirk HeylenAffiliated withHuman Media Interaction, University of Twente

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Abstract

Reliable applications of affective brain-computer interfaces (aBCI) in realistic, multi-modal environments require a detailed understanding of the processes involved in emotions. To explore the modality-specific nature of affective responses, we studied neurophysiological responses (i.e., EEG) of 24 participants during visual, auditory, and audiovisual affect stimulation. The affect induction protocols were validated by participants’ subjective ratings and physiological responses (i.e., ECG). Coherent with literature, we found modality-specific responses in the EEG: posterior alpha power decreases during visual stimulation and increases during auditory stimulation, anterior alpha power tends to decrease during auditory stimulation and to increase during visual stimulation. We discuss the implications of these results for multi-modal aBCI.

Keywords

affective brain-computer interfaces emotion ECG EEG visual auditory multi-modal