Haptics for Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery

  • A. M. Okamura
  • L. N. Verner
  • C. E. Reiley
  • M. Mahvash
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-14743-2_30

Volume 66 of the book series Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics (STAR)
Cite this paper as:
Okamura A.M., Verner L.N., Reiley C.E., Mahvash M. (2010) Haptics for Robot-Assisted Minimally Invasive Surgery. In: Kaneko M., Nakamura Y. (eds) Robotics Research. Springer Tracts in Advanced Robotics, vol 66. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery (RMIS) holds great promise for improving the accuracy and dexterity of a surgeon while minimizing trauma to the patient. However, widespread clinical success with RMIS has been marginal and it is hypothesized by engineers and surgeons alike that the lack of haptic feedback presented to the surgeon is a limiting factor. The objective of our research is to acquire, display, and determine the utility of haptic information during RMIS. This overview paper examines the design, analysis, practicality, and effectiveness of various force estimation and display methods. In particular, we describe our experience in adding force feedback to an experimental version of the da Vinci surgical system, a commercially available teleoperated RMIS system.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Okamura
    • 1
  • L. N. Verner
    • 1
  • C. E. Reiley
    • 1
  • M. Mahvash
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology, Laboratory for Computational Sensing and RoboticsThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA