Know What You Trust

Analyzing and Designing Trust Policies with Scoll
  • Fred Spiessens
  • Jerry den Hartog
  • Sandro Etalle
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-01465-9_9

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 5491)
Cite this paper as:
Spiessens F., den Hartog J., Etalle S. (2009) Know What You Trust. In: Degano P., Guttman J., Martinelli F. (eds) Formal Aspects in Security and Trust. FAST 2008. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 5491. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

In Decentralized Trust Management (DTM) authorization decisions are made by multiple principals who can also delegate decisions to each other. Therefore, a policy change of one principal will often affect who gets authorized by another principal. In such a system of influenceable authorization a number of principals may want to coordinate their policies to achieve long time guarantees on a set of safety goals.

The problem we tackle in this paper is to find minimal restrictions to the policies of a set of principals that achieve their safety goals. This will enable building useful DTM systems that are safe by design, simply by relying on the policy restrictions of the collaborating principals. To this end we will model DTM safety problems in Scoll [1], an approach that proved useful to model confinement in object capability systems [2].

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred Spiessens
    • 1
  • Jerry den Hartog
    • 1
  • Sandro Etalle
    • 1
  1. 1.Eindhoven Institute for the Protection of Systems and InformationUniversity of Technology EindhovenEindhovenThe Netherlands

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