GENIE: a Ground-Based European Nulling Instrument at ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer

  • P. Gondoin
  • R. den Hartog
  • M. Fridlund
  • P. Fabry
  • A. Stankov
  • A. Peacock
  • S. Volonte
  • F. Puech
  • F. Delplancke
  • P. Gitton
  • A. Glindemann
  • F. Paresce
  • A. Richichi
  • M. Barillot
  • O. Absil
  • F. Cassaing
  • V. Coudédu Foresto
  • P. Kervella
  • G. Perrin
  • C. Ruilier
  • R. Flatscher
  • H. Bokhove
  • K. Ergenzinger
  • A. Quirrenbach
  • O. Wallner
  • J. Alves
  • T. Herbst
  • D. Mourard
  • R. Neuhäuser
  • D. Ségransan
  • R. Waters
  • G.J. White
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-74256-2_51

Part of the Eso Astrophysics Symposia book series (ESO)
Cite this paper as:
Gondoin P. et al. (2007) GENIE: a Ground-Based European Nulling Instrument at ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer. In: Richichi A., Delplancke F., Paresce F., Chelli A. (eds) The Power of Optical/IR Interferometry: Recent Scientific Results and 2nd Generation Instrumentation. Eso Astrophysics Symposia (European Southern Observatory). Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Summary

Darwin is one of the most challenging space projects ever considered by the European Space Agency (ESA). Its principal objectives are to detect Earth-like planets around nearby stars, to analyze the composition of their atmospheres and to assess their ability to sustain life as we know it. Darwin is conceived as a space “nulling interferometer” which makes use of on-axis destructive interferences to extinguish the stellar light while keeping the off-axis signal of the orbiting planet. Within the frame of the Darwin program, definition studies of a Ground based European Nulling Interferometry Experiment, called GENIE, were completed in 2005. This instrument built around the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) in Paranal will test some of the key technologies required for the Darwin Infrared Space Interferometer. GENIE will operate in the L’ band around 3.8 microns as a single Bracewell nulling interferometer using either two Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) or two 8m Unit Telescopes (UTs). Its science objectives include the detection and characterization of dust disks and low-mass companions around nearby stars.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Gondoin
    • 1
  • R. den Hartog
    • 1
  • M. Fridlund
    • 1
  • P. Fabry
    • 1
  • A. Stankov
    • 1
  • A. Peacock
    • 1
  • S. Volonte
    • 1
  • F. Puech
    • 2
  • F. Delplancke
    • 2
  • P. Gitton
    • 2
  • A. Glindemann
    • 2
  • F. Paresce
    • 2
  • A. Richichi
    • 2
  • M. Barillot
    • 3
  • O. Absil
    • 4
  • F. Cassaing
    • 5
  • V. Coudédu Foresto
    • 6
  • P. Kervella
    • 6
  • G. Perrin
    • 6
  • C. Ruilier
    • 3
  • R. Flatscher
    • 7
  • H. Bokhove
    • 8
  • K. Ergenzinger
    • 7
  • A. Quirrenbach
    • 9
  • O. Wallner
    • 7
  • J. Alves
    • 2
  • T. Herbst
    • 10
  • D. Mourard
    • 11
  • R. Neuhäuser
    • 12
  • D. Ségransan
    • 13
  • R. Waters
    • 14
  • G.J. White
    • 15
  1. 1.European Space Agency2200AG NoordwijkNetherlands
  2. 2.European Southern ObservatoryD-85748 Garching bei MunchenGermany
  3. 3.Alcatel Space06156 Cannes La BoccaFrance
  4. 4.University of LiegeB-4000 Sart-TilmanBelgium
  5. 5.Office National d’Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales92322 France
  6. 6.Observatoire de Paris-Meudon92195 MeudonFrance
  7. 7.Astrium GmbhD-88039 FriedrichshafenGermany
  8. 8.TNO institute of Applied Physics2600 AD DelftNetherlands
  9. 9.Leiden University2300 RA LeidenNetherlands
  10. 10.Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie69117 HeidelbergGermany
  11. 11.Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur F-06460 St. Vallier de ThieyFrance
  12. 12.Universität Jena07795 JenaGermany
  13. 13.Observatoire de Geneve1290 SauvernySwitzerland
  14. 14.University of Amsterdam1098 SJ AmsterdamNetherlands
  15. 15.University of Kent CanterburyKent CT2 7NRUnited Kingdom

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