Stereoscopic Motion Magnification in Minimally-Invasive Robotic Prostatectomy

  • A. Jonathan McLeod
  • John S. H. Baxter
  • Uditha Jayarathne
  • Stephen Pautler
  • Terry M. Peters
  • Xiongbiao Luo
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-29965-5_4

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 9515)
Cite this paper as:
McLeod A.J., Baxter J.S.H., Jayarathne U., Pautler S., Peters T.M., Luo X. (2016) Stereoscopic Motion Magnification in Minimally-Invasive Robotic Prostatectomy. In: Luo X., Reichl T., Reiter A., Mariottini GL. (eds) Computer-Assisted and Robotic Endoscopy. CARE 2015. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 9515. Springer, Cham

Abstract

The removal of the prostate is a common treatment option for localized prostate cancer. Robotic prostatectomy uses endoscopic cameras to provide a stereoscopic view of the surgical scene to the surgeon. Often, this surgical scene is difficult to interpret because of variants in anatomy and some critical structures such as the neurovascular bundles alongside the prostate, are affected by variations in size and shape of the prostate. The objective of this article is to develop a real-time stereoscopic video processing framework to improve the perceptibly of the surgical scene, using Eulerian Motion Magnification to exaggerate the subtle pulsatile behavior of the neurovascular bundles. This framework has been validated on both digital phantoms and retrospective analysis of robotic prostatectomy video.

Keywords

Robotic prostatectomy Motion magnification Stereoscopic video processing 

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Jonathan McLeod
    • 1
    • 2
  • John S. H. Baxter
    • 1
    • 2
  • Uditha Jayarathne
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stephen Pautler
    • 3
  • Terry M. Peters
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiongbiao Luo
    • 1
  1. 1.Robarts Research InstituteWestern UniversityLondonCanada
  2. 2.Biomedical Engineering Graduate ProgramWestern UniversityLondonCanada
  3. 3.Division of Urology, Department of SurgeryWestern UniversityLondonCanada

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