Chapter

Reconstructive Neurosurgery

Volume 101 of the series Acta Neurochirurgica Supplementum pp 163-168

Radiosurgery from the brain to the spine: 20 years experience

  • Antonio A. F. De SallesAffiliated withDivision of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of CaliforniaDepartment of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California
  • , A. A. GorgulhoAffiliated withDivision of Neurosurgery, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California
  • , M. SelchAffiliated withDepartment of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California
  • , J. De MarcoAffiliated withDepartment of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California
  • , N. AgazaryanAffiliated withDepartment of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California

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Abstract

Introduction

Radiosurgery evolved from brain to spine. Mechanical and computer advances in linear accelerator (LINAC) radiosurgery apply precise single/fractional stereotactic radiation to multiple pathologies.

Methods

During a 10-year span the senior author used proton-beam radiosurgery in over 300 lesions, followed by gamma-knife, adapted and dedicated LINACS, including cyber-knife, in another 700 patients. The last 10 years, experience was accumulated with the Novalis in over 3,000 patients. Novalis uses a beam-shaper in a high-speed delivery LINAC. It operates using conventional circular arc, conformai static beam, dynamic conformai or intensity modulated modes. Patients treated with Novalis at the UCLA since 1997 were evaluated regarding effectiveness, complications and failure. These results were compared with previous 1997 data.

Results

Over 4,000 patients with trigeminal neuralgia/intractable pain, arteriovenous malformations/angiomas, métastases, ependymomas, gliomas, meningiomas hemangiopericytomas, schwannomas, adenomas, hemangioblastomas, and chordoma were treated. Spinal lesions were treated with frameless stereotaxis and on-line precision checks. Treatment was expeditious, comfortable and with reduced complications. Success is similar or superior to published data. Reduced treatment time of complex lesions and highly homogeneous dose compares favorably to other radiosurgery.

Conclusions

The senior author’s experience validates the novel shaped-beam approach. Long-term follow-up supports safety and effectiveness and capability to treat brain and spine.

Keywords

Proton beam linear accelerator gamma-knife radiosurgery spine