Chapter

Bradykinin and Related Kinins

Volume 8 of the series Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology pp 239-247

Microcirculatory Actions of Polypeptides and Their Use in the Treatment of Experimental Shock

  • Burton M. AlturaAffiliated withDepartments of Anesthesiology and Physiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • , S. G. HersheyAffiliated withDepartments of Anesthesiology and Physiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • , Bella T. AlturaAffiliated withDepartments of Anesthesiology and Physiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine

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Abstract

In the normal regulation of the microcirculation it is generally accepted that the catecholamines serve as the undifferential tonic constrictor influence on the muscular mîcrovessels(1). To achieve appropriate local vasomotor behavior, which must be adjusted from moment to moment, the unselective constrictor influence of the catecholamines is thought to be modulated by a host of local tissue mediators such as serotonin, histamine, acetylcholine, glucocorticoids, and metabolic by-products as well as by the ratio of alpha to beta adrenergic receptors in different vessel s (1–5). These local tissue mediators probably also include low molecular weight polypeptides. Until recently, most interest in these tissue vasoactive polypeptides has focused on the kinin class of compounds which are thought to essentially dilate vessels and/or depress vasomotor activity(6). But there is little question that these locally acting substances also include polypeptides which are essentially excitor such as angiotensin and the neurohypophyseal polypeptide hormones (NHPH). Ever since the classic work of August Krogh and Sir Henry Dale with pituitrine, it has been repeatedly suggested by many workers that the posterior pituitary hormones lend fine adjustment to the tonic constrictor action of the catecholamines (see ref.7 for citations).