Chapter

Biogeochemistry of Global Change

pp 811-824

Bromoperoxidases: Their Role in the Formation of HOBr and Bromoform by Seaweeds

  • R. WeverAffiliated withE.C. Slater Institute for Biochemical Research and Biotechnological Centre
  • , M. G. M. TrompAffiliated withE.C. Slater Institute for Biochemical Research and Biotechnological Centre
  • , J. W. P. M. van SchijndelAffiliated withE.C. Slater Institute for Biochemical Research and Biotechnological Centre
  • , E. VollenbroekAffiliated withE.C. Slater Institute for Biochemical Research and Biotechnological Centre
  • , R. L. OlsenAffiliated withNorwegian Institute of Fisheries and Aquaculture
  • , E. FogelqvistAffiliated withOceanographic Laboratory, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute

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Abstract

The biogenic release of halogenated volatile organics from the ocean by natural sources and the biochemical pathways which lead to the production of these substances are not well understood. In this chapter, some of the marine sources are discussed and results are presented and reviewed on the role of vanadium bromoperoxidases from seaweeds in the formation of halomethanes. Further, it will be shown that most of the predominant seaweed species from the North Atlantic, which are also present in the Arctic Ocean, contain bromoperoxidases. In contrast, in members of the Desmarestiales collected in the Weddell Sea (Antarctic) which provide the bulk of the biomass of benthic seaweeds in the Antarctic waters, no bromoperoxidase activity could be detected. The distribu;tion of seaweeds with bromoperoxidase activity is correlated with the seawater concentration of bromoform.