Chapter

Proteins Membrane Binding and Pore Formation

Volume 677 of the series Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology pp 127-142

Pore formation by Cry toxins

  • Mario SoberónAffiliated withInstituto de Biotecnologia UNAM. Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • , Liliana PardoAffiliated withInstituto de Biotecnologia UNAM. Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • , Carlos Muñóz-GarayAffiliated withInstituto de Biotecnologia UNAM. Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • , Jorge SánchezAffiliated withInstituto de Biotecnologia UNAM. Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • , Isabel GómezAffiliated withInstituto de Biotecnologia UNAM. Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • , Helena PortaAffiliated withInstituto de Biotecnologia UNAM. Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
  • , Alejandra BravoAffiliated withInstituto de Biotecnologia UNAM. Departamento de Microbiología Molecular, Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México Email author 

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Abstract

B acillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce insecticidal Cry and Cyt proteins used in the biological control of different insect pests. In this review, we will focus on the 3d-Cry toxins that represent the biggest group of Cry proteins and also on Cyt toxins. The 3d-Cry toxins are pore-forming toxins that induce cell death by forming ionic pores into the membrane of the midgut epithelial cells in their target insect. The initial steps in the mode of action include ingestion of the protoxin, activation by midgut proteases to produce the toxin fragment and the interaction with the primary cadherin receptor. The interaction of the monomeric Cry1A toxin with the cadherin receptor promotes an extra proteolytic cleavage, where helix α-1 of domain I is eliminated and the toxin oligomerization is induced, forming a structure of 250 kDa. The oligomeric structure binds to a secondary receptor, aminopeptidase N or alkaline phosphatase. The secondary receptor drives the toxin into detergent resistant membrane microdomains forming pores that cause osmotic shock, burst of the midgut cells and insect death. Regarding to Cyt toxins, these proteins have a synergistic effect on the toxicity of some Cry toxins. Cyt proteins are also proteolytic activated in the midgut lumen of their target, they bind to some phospholipids present in the mosquito midgut cells. The proposed mechanism of synergism between Cry and Cyt toxins is that Cyt1Aa function as a receptor for Cry toxins. The Cyt1A inserts into midgut epithelium membrane and exposes protein regions that are recognized by Cry11Aa. It was demonstrated that this interaction facilitates the oligomerization of Cry11Aa and also its pore formation activity.