Chapter

Retinal Degenerative Diseases

Volume 664 of the series Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology pp 457-463

Date:

Slit-Robo Signaling in Ocular Angiogenesis

  • Haoyu ChenAffiliated withJoint Shantou International Eye Center, Shantou University and the Chinese University of Hong KongMoran Eye Center, University of Utah Email author 
  • , Mingzhi ZhangAffiliated withJoint Shantou International Eye Center, Shantou University and the Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • , Shibo TangAffiliated withState Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University
  • , Nyall R. LondonAffiliated withDepartment of Oncological Sciences and Medicine and Program in Human Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Utah
  • , Dean Y. LiAffiliated withDepartment of Oncological Sciences and Medicine and Program in Human Molecular Biology and Genetics, University of Utah
  • , Kang ZhangAffiliated withMoran Eye Center, University of UtahInstitute for Genomic Medicine and Shiley Eye Center, University of California at San Diego

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Slit-Robo signaling was firstly discovered as a major repellent pathway at the midline of the central nervous system. Intense investigation found that this pathway also plays an important role in other biological process including angiogenesis. Robo4 is the vascular endothelial cell specific member of Robo family. It was found that Slit-Robo signaling can inhibit endothelial cell migration, tube formation and vascular permeability. Slit-Robo signaling also plays an important role in embryonic and tumor angiogenesis. In animal model of ocular angiogenesis, addition of Slit inhibited laser induced choroidal neovascularization, oxygen induced retinopathy and VEGF induced retinal permeability in a Robo4 dependent manner. Recent data demonstrates that Robo1 and Robo4 form a heterodimer in endothelial cells, The role of this heterodimer in counteracting VEGF signaling is unknown. Further investigation is required to better understand Slit-Robo signaling and develop novel therapy for angiogenesis.