Chapter

Tissue Engineering

Volume 585 of the series Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology pp 431-441

Molecular Mechanism of Osteochondroprogenitor Fate Determination During Bone Formation

  • Lijin ZouAffiliated withOrthopaedic Research Laboratory, Aarhus University HospitalThe First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University
  • , Xuenong ZouAffiliated withOrthopaedic Research Laboratory, Aarhus University HospitalDepartment of Orthopaedics, the 5th Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University
  • , Haisheng LiAffiliated withOrthopaedic Research Laboratory, Aarhus University Hospital
  • , Tina MygindAffiliated withOrthopaedic Research Laboratory, Aarhus University Hospital
  • , Yuanlin ZengAffiliated withThe First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University
  • , Nonghua LüAffiliated withThe First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University
  • , Cody BüngerAffiliated withOrthopaedic Research Laboratory, Aarhus University Hospital

28.1 Abstract

Osteoblasts and chondrocytes, which derive from a common mesenchymal precursor (osteochondroprogenitor), are involved in bone formation and remodeling in vivo. Determination of osteochondroprogenitor fate is under the control of complex hormonal and local factors converging onto a series of temporospatial dependent transcription regulators. Sox9, together with L-Sox5 and Sox6, of the Sox family is required for chondrogenic differentiation commitment, while Runx2/Cbfa1, a member of runt family and Osterix/Osx, a novel zinc finger-containing transcription factor play a pivotal role in osteoblast differentiation decision and hypertrophic chondrocyte maturation. Recent in vitro and in vivo evidence suggests β-catenin, a transcriptional activator in the canonical Wnt pathway, can act as a determinant factor for controlling chondrocyte and osteoblast differentiation. Here we focus on several intensively studied transcription factors and Wnt/β-catenin signal molecules to illustrate the regulatory mechanism in directing commitment between osteoblast and chondrocyte, which will eventually allow us to properly manipulate the mesenchymal progenitor cell differentiation on bone and regeneration of cartilage tissue engineering.