Chapter

Henipavirus

Volume 359 of the series Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology pp 197-223

Date:

Immunization Strategies Against Henipaviruses

  • Christopher C. BroderAffiliated withDepartment of Microbiology and Immunology, Uniformed Services University Email author 
  • , Thomas W. GeisbertAffiliated withGalveston National Laboratory and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Texas Medical Branch
  • , Kai XuAffiliated withStructural Biology Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • , Dimitar B. NikolovAffiliated withStructural Biology Program, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • , Lin-Fa WangAffiliated withCSIRO Livestock Industries, Australian Animal Health Laboratory
  • , Deborah MiddletonAffiliated withCSIRO Livestock Industries, Australian Animal Health Laboratory
  • , Jackie PallisterAffiliated withCSIRO Livestock Industries, Australian Animal Health Laboratory
  • , Katharine N. BossartAffiliated withDepartment of Microbiology, Boston University School of MedicineNational Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories Institute, Boston University School of Medicine

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Abstract

Hendra virus and Nipah virus are recently discovered and closely related emerging viruses that now comprise the genus henipavirus within the sub-family Paramyxoviridae and are distinguished by their broad species tropism and in addition to bats can infect and cause fatal disease in a wide variety of mammalian hosts including humans. The high mortality associated with human and animal henipavirus infections has highlighted the importance and necessity of developing effective immunization strategies. The development of suitable animal models of henipavirus infection and pathogenesis has been critical for testing the efficacy of potential therapeutic approaches. Several henipavirus challenge models have been used and recent successes in both active and passive immunization strategies against henipaviruses have been reported which have all targeted the viral envelope glycoproteins.