Instrumenting the City: Developing Methods for Observing and Understanding the Digital Cityscape

  • Eamonn O’Neill
  • Vassilis Kostakos
  • Tim Kindberg
  • Ava Fatah gen. Schiek
  • Alan Penn
  • Danaë Stanton Fraser
  • Tim Jones
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/11853565_19

Volume 4206 of the book series Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS)
Cite this paper as:
O’Neill E. et al. (2006) Instrumenting the City: Developing Methods for Observing and Understanding the Digital Cityscape. In: Dourish P., Friday A. (eds) UbiComp 2006: Ubiquitous Computing. UbiComp 2006. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 4206. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

We approach the design of ubiquitous computing systems in the urban environment as integral to urban design. To understand the city as a system encompassing physical and digital forms and their relationships with people’s behaviours, we are developing, applying and refining methods of observing, recording, modelling and analysing the city, physically, digitally and socially. We draw on established methods used in the space syntax approach to urban design. Here we describe how we have combined scanning for discoverable Bluetooth devices with two such methods, gatecounts and static snapshots. We report our experiences in developing, field testing and refining these augmented methods. We present initial findings on the Bluetooth landscape in a city in terms of patterns of Bluetooth presence and Bluetooth naming practices.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eamonn O’Neill
    • 1
  • Vassilis Kostakos
    • 1
  • Tim Kindberg
    • 2
  • Ava Fatah gen. Schiek
    • 3
  • Alan Penn
    • 3
  • Danaë Stanton Fraser
    • 4
  • Tim Jones
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of BathUK
  2. 2.Hewlett-Packard LaboratoriesBristolUK
  3. 3.The Bartlett, University College LondonUK
  4. 4.Department of PsychologyUniversity of BathUK