FELIX 3D Display: Human-Machine Interface for Interactive Real Three-Dimensional Imaging

  • Knut Langhans
  • Klaas Oltmann
  • Sebastian Reil
  • Lars Goldberg
  • Hannes Hatecke
Conference paper

DOI: 10.1007/11590361_3

Volume 3805 of the book series Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS)
Cite this paper as:
Langhans K., Oltmann K., Reil S., Goldberg L., Hatecke H. (2005) FELIX 3D Display: Human-Machine Interface for Interactive Real Three-Dimensional Imaging. In: Subsol G. (eds) Virtual Storytelling. Using Virtual Reality Technologies for Storytelling. ICVS 2005. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 3805. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

Abstract

Flat 2D screens cannot display complex 3D structures without the usage of different slices of the 3D model. A volumetric display, like the FELIX 3D Display can solve this problem. It provides space-filling images and is characterized by “multi-viewer” and “all-round view” capabilities without requiring cumbersome goggles.

The FELIX 3D Displays of the swept volume type use laser-light to project real three-dimensional images upwards a rotating screen. Because of some disadvantages using rotating parts in this setup, the FELIX Team started investigations also in the area of static volume displays. The so called, “SolidFELIX” prototypes, have transparent crystals as a projection volume. The image is created by two or one IR-laser beams.

The projected images within all FELIX 3D Displays provide a fascinating, aesthetic impression through their inherent, unique three-dimensional appearance. These features of a 3D display could be combined in an interface between a virtual reality scene and the real world. Real-time interactions and animations are possible. Furthermore, the display could host an intelligent autonomous avatar that might appear within the display volume.

Potential applications as a virtual reality interface include the fields of entertainment, education, art, museum exhibitions, etc.

The FELIX 3D project team has evolved from a scientific working group of students and teachers at a normal high school in northern Germany. Despite minor funding resources considerable results have been achieved in the past.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Knut Langhans
    • 1
  • Klaas Oltmann
    • 1
  • Sebastian Reil
    • 1
  • Lars Goldberg
    • 1
  • Hannes Hatecke
    • 1
  1. 1.Youth Research CenterVincent-Luebeck-High-SchoolStadeGermany