Isotopic Fractionation of Carbon: Inorganic and Biological Processes

Purchase on Springer.com

$29.95 / €24.95 / £19.95*

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Stable and radioactive isotopes are extensively used as tracers of numerous processes in the planetary and terrestrial environment. The relative abundances of isotopic species measured by their ratios provide indications of the origin of various materials and differences in the abundance ratios that develop in different processes make it possible to identify the mechanisms behind a variety of phenomena in extraterrestrial space, within the solid Earth, on its surface, and in the biosphere. The improvements in the sensitivity and precision of mass spectrometers used for the determination of isotope abundances are continually expanding the number of isotopes that can be identified in natural materials aswell as the understanding of the mechanisms that drivemany parts of the Earth’s system. The involvement of carbon dioxide in many geochemical inorganic as well as biogeochemical processes focused long ago attention on the behavior of the different isotopic species of CO2 and made possible many new interpretations of processes in the atmosphere, on land, in the oceanic and continental waters, and within the biosphere. The goal of this Chapter is to review the essentials of the isotope geochemistry of carbon dioxide and the mechanisms of its isotopic fractionation, and to discuss the broader aspects of the global carbon cycle that are based on the carbonisotope geochemistry.