Bioanalytical Reviews

Description

NEW since 2013: Springer is proud to announce its new chemistry review book series in the area of Bioanalytics and Bioanalytical Chemistry: "Bioanalytical Reviews". Bioanalytical Reviews is the successor of the former review journal with the same name, and it complements Springer's successful and reputed review book series program in the flourishing and exciting area of the Bioanalytical Sciences.

Bioanalytical Reviews (BAR) publishes reviews covering all aspects of bioanalytical sciences. It therefore is a unique source of quick and authoritative information for anybody using bioanalytical methods in areas such as medicine, biology, biochemistry, genetics, pharmacology, biotechnology, and the like.

Reviews of methods include all modern tools applied, including mass spectrometry, HPLC (in its various forms), capillary electrophoresis, biosensors, bioelectroanalysis, fluorescence, IR/Raman, and other optical spectroscopies, NMR radiometry, and methods related to bioimaging. In particular the series volumes provide reviews on perspective new instrumental approaches as they apply to bioanalysis, and on the use of micro-/nano-materials such as micro- and nanoparticles. Articles on μ-total analytical systems (μ-TAS) and on labs-on-a-chip also fall into this category.

In terms of applications, reviews on novel bioanalytical methods based on the use of enzymes, DNAzymes, antibodies, cell slices, to mention the more typical ones, are highly welcome. Articles on subjects related to the areas including genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, high-throughput screening, but also bioinformatics and statistics as they relate to bioanalytical methods are of course also welcome. Reviews cover both fundamental aspects and practical applications.

Reviews published in BAR are (a) of wider scope and authoratively written (rather than a record of the research of single authors), (b) critical, but balanced and unbiased; (c) timely, with the latest references. BAR does not publish (a) reviews describing established methods of bioanalysis; (b) reviews that lack wider scope, (c) reviews of mainly theoretical nature.