SpringerBriefs in History of Science and Technology

Description

The SpringerBriefs in the History of Science and Technology series addresses, in the broadest sense, the history of man’s empirical and theoretical understanding of Nature and the processes and people involved in acquiring this understanding. The series provides a forum for shorter works which may not suit the traditional book model. SpringerBriefs are typically between 50 and 125 pages in length; between the limit of a journal review article and a conventional book.
Authored by science historians and scientists across physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, mathematics, astronomy, technology and related disciplines, the volumes will comprise:
1. Accounts of the development of scientific ideas at any pertinent stage in history: from the earliest observations of Babylonian Astronomers, through the abstract and practical advances of Classical Antiquity, the scientific revolution of the Age of Reason, to the fast-moving progress seen in modern R&D.
2. Biographies, full or partial, of key thinkers and science pioneers.
3. Historical documents such as letters, manuscripts, or reports, together with annotation and analysis
4. Works addressing social aspects of science history (the role of institutes and societies, the interaction of science and politics, etc.)
The series is aimed at a wide audience of academic scientists and historians, but many of the volumes will also appeal to general readers interested in the evolution of scientific ideas and in man’s ongoing endeavour to understand the natural world.
All proposals will be considered, but we particularly welcome short biographies of lesser-known figures from the history of science; those who deserve wider recognition for their influence on a given field.