Advances in Decision Making Under Risk and Uncertainty

Editors:

ISBN: 978-3-540-68436-7 (Print) 978-3-540-68437-4 (Online)

Table of contents (14 chapters)

  1. Front Matter

    Pages i-xiii

  2. Uncertainty and Information Modeling

    1. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 3-18

      Revealed Ambiguity and Its Consequences: Updating

    2. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 19-32

      Dynamic Decision Making When Risk Perception Depends on Past Experience

    3. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 33-47

      Representation of Conditional Preferences Under Uncertainty

    4. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 49-62

      Subjective Information in Decision Making and Communication

  3. Risk Modeling

    1. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 65-89

      Sensitivity Analysis in Decision Making: A Consistent Approach

    2. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 91-107

      Alternation Bias and the Parameterization of Cumulative Prospect Theory

    3. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 109-118

      Proposing a Normative Basis for the S-Shaped Value Function

  4. Experimental Individual Decision Making

    1. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 121-135

      Individual Choice from a Convex Lottery Set: Experimental Evidence

    2. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 137-150

      Temptations and Dynamic Consistency

    3. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 151-162

      Monty Hall’s Three Doors for Dummies

    4. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 163-180

      Overconfidence in Predictions as an Effect of Desirability Bias

  5. Experimental Interactive Decision Making

    1. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 183-204

      Granny Versus Game Theorist: Ambiguity in Experimental Games

    2. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 205-217

      Guessing Games and People Behaviours: What Can We Learn?

    3. No Access

      Book Chapter

      Pages 219-241

      The Determinants of Individual Behaviour in Network Formation: Some Experimental Evidence