, Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 162-174

Perceptual localization of visual stimuli flashed during saccades

Abstract

Subjects were asked to make a saccade to a visual target flashed in the dark during a prior primary saccade, and to report its apparent position by moving an adjustable light spot to that position. When targets were presented at the beginning of the primary saccade, subjects perceptually mislocated them in the direction of the saccade, whereas when targets were presented immediately before the end of the primary saccade, the flashed targets were mislocated in the opposite direction. The perceptually localized position of the target was primarily determined by its retinal position. However, at all actual and retinal positions of the target, the localized position shifted from the position that would be predicted if the location of the target was determined only by its retinal position to the prior primary sacade direction. The results were discussed in relation to extraretinal eye position signals. Subjects moved their eyes not to the actual position of the target, but to its apparent position. In some trials, there was a discrepancy between perceptual and oculomotor localization, which was interpreted as having been caused by the imprecise localization ability of the oculomotor system.