Memory & Cognition

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 703–714

Use of morphology in spelling by children with dyslexia and typically developing children

  • Derrick C. Bourassa
  • Rebecca Treiman
  • Brett Kessler
Article

DOI: 10.3758/BF03193589

Cite this article as:
Bourassa, D.C., Treiman, R. & Kessler, B. Memory & Cognition (2006) 34: 703. doi:10.3758/BF03193589
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Abstract

In English and some other languages, spelling problems that arise at a phonological level can sometimes be solved through consideration of morphology. For example, children could infer that tuned should contain ann and thatfighting should contain a t because their stems include these letters. Children could thus avoid misspellings that might otherwise occur, such as “tudrd and “fiding.” We used a spelling-level match design to examine the extent to which children with dyslexia and younger typical children use morphology in this way. Both groups of children benefited from morphology to some extent, but not as much as they could have given their knowledge of the stems. Our results suggest that the spellings produced by older children with dyslexia are similar to those of younger normal children in their morphological characteristics, as well as in other ways.

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Copyright information

© Psychonomic Society, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Derrick C. Bourassa
    • 1
  • Rebecca Treiman
    • 2
  • Brett Kessler
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of WinnipegWinnipegCanada
  2. 2.Washington UniversitySt. Louis