Drugs & Aging

, Volume 27, Issue 3, pp 211–238

Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in the Elderly

Authors

  • Paolo F. Caimi
    • Department of Medicine, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, University Hospitals Case Medical CenterCase Western Reserve University
  • Paul M. Barr
    • Department of Medicine, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, University Hospitals Case Medical CenterCase Western Reserve University
  • Nathan A. Berger
    • Department of Medicine, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, University Hospitals Case Medical CenterCase Western Reserve University
    • Department of Medicine, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, University Hospitals Case Medical CenterCase Western Reserve University
Review Article

DOI: 10.2165/11531550-000000000-00000

Cite this article as:
Caimi, P.F., Barr, P.M., Berger, N.A. et al. Drugs Aging (2010) 27: 211. doi:10.2165/11531550-000000000-00000

Abstract

The expansion of older population segments and the continuous increase in the incidence of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) makes this group of neoplasms an important and growing problem. Older NHL patients have increased risk of therapy-related toxicity as a result of age-related physiological changes and frequent co-morbidities. A functional assessment of the elderly patient is necessary to determine the likelihood of tolerating and responding to therapy. The comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is one multidisciplinary tool that has been applied successfully to older cancer patients and aids in identification of subjects who will or will not benefit from anti-neoplastic treatment.

Although indolent lymphomas present more frequently at advanced stage, randomized trials do not show better outcomes with early therapy, supporting close observation until specific therapeutic indications arise. Use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapy improves survival and has become the standard of care in first-line treatment. Radioimmunoconjugates, bendamustine, and other monoclonal antibodies as well as novel targeted agents also are active against indolent lymphomas. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is an aggressive but potentially curable disease. Several trials performed exclusively in elderly patients have demonstrated improved response rates and survival with the addition of rituximab to CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin [adriamycin], vincristine, prednisone) chemotherapy in the front-line setting. Salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic cell transplant (autoHCT) has been shown to have better failure-free and overall survival in randomized trials involving younger patients. Highly selected individuals up to age 70 years may attain long-term survival benefit from autoHCT, although transplant-related mortality is higher than in younger patients.

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© Adis Data Information BV 2010