American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs

, Volume 1, Issue 4, pp 233–244

Myocardial Regeneration

Present and Future Trends

Authors

  • Sharon Etzion
    • Neufeld Cardiac Research InstituteTel-Aviv University, Sheba Medical Center
    • Cardiac Research CenterBen-Gurion University
  • Laurence H. Kedes
    • Institute for Genetic Medicine, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
    • Department of Medicine, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern California
  • Robert A. Kloner
    • Department of Medicine, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern California
    • The Heart InstituteThe Good Samaritan Hospital
    • Neufeld Cardiac Research InstituteTel-Aviv University, Sheba Medical Center
Leading Article

DOI: 10.2165/00129784-200101040-00002

Cite this article as:
Etzion, S., Kedes, L.H., Kloner, R.A. et al. Am J Cordiovosc Drugs (2001) 1: 233. doi:10.2165/00129784-200101040-00002

Abstract

Cardiomyocytes are terminally differentiated and are unable to proliferate in response to injury. Genetic modulation, cell transplantation and tissue engineering promise a revolutionary approach for myocardial regeneration and tissue repair after myocardial injury. Current data derived from animal models suggest that it may be possible to treat heart failure by inserting genetic materials or myogenic cells into injured myocardium. Success with animal models has raised the hope for new treatment after heart attacks and could prove an alternative to transplantation, particularly in elderly patients for whom there is often a lack of donor hearts. This exciting research, however, still faces significant difficulties before it can develop into a clinical therapeutic tool and many challenges need to be overcome before cell transplantation, gene therapy and tissue engineering can be considered efficient, therapeutic strategies for myocardial regeneration.

Copyright information

© Adis International Limited 2001