Journal of Zhejiang University SCIENCE B

, Volume 11, Issue 11, pp 842–847

Pure word deafness associated with extrapontine myelinolysis

Authors

  • Ren-jing Zhu
    • Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of MedicineZhejiang University
    • Department of Neurology, Zhongshan HospitalXiamen University
  • Zhi-su Lv
    • Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of MedicineZhejiang University
    • Department of Ultrasonography, Children’s Hospital, School of MedicineZhejiang University
  • Chun-lei Shan
    • Laboratory for Higher Brain Function, Institute of PsychologyChinese Academy of Sciences
    • Department of Rehabilitation Medicinethe First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University
  • Ming-wei Xu
    • Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of MedicineZhejiang University
    • Department of Neurology, the First Affiliated Hospital, School of MedicineZhejiang University
Case Report

DOI: 10.1631/jzus.B1000200

Cite this article as:
Zhu, R., Lv, Z., Shan, C. et al. J. Zhejiang Univ. Sci. B (2010) 11: 842. doi:10.1631/jzus.B1000200

Abstract

Extrapontine myelinolysis and pure word deafness are very uncommon disorders. Here, we report a case of a 19-year-old woman who suffered from osmotic demyelination syndrome with coincidence of typical pure word deafness. As a consequence of rapid correction of hyponatremia, the patient demonstrated an initial onset of cortical deafness, and then progressed to generalized auditory agnosia, which eventually developed into confined verbal auditory agnosia (pure word deafness). Bilateral extrapontine myelinolysis was confirmed using brain magnetic resonance imaging. This case suggests that verbal and nonverbal stimuli may involve separate thalamocortical pathways.

Key words

Pure word deafnessAuditory agnosiaOsmotic demyelination syndromeExtrapontine myelinolysisCortical deafness

CLC number

R74

Copyright information

© Zhejiang University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010