Molecular Biotechnology

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 245–259

Recombinant protein production in yeasts

Authors

    • Department of Biotechnology and BioscienceUniversity of Milano-Bicocca
  • Michael Sauer
    • Institute of Applied MicrobiologyBOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences
  • Paola Branduardi
    • Department of Biotechnology and BioscienceUniversity of Milano-Bicocca
  • Diethard Mattanovich
    • Institute of Applied MicrobiologyBOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences
Review

DOI: 10.1385/MB:31:3:245

Cite this article as:
Porro, D., Sauer, M., Branduardi, P. et al. Mol Biotechnol (2005) 31: 245. doi:10.1385/MB:31:3:245

Abstract

Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies (genetic, protein, and metabolic engineering) allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins, and biochemicals from naturally nonproducing cells. These technologies, now approx 25 yr old, have become one of the most important technologies developed in the twentieth century. Pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes were the first biotech products on the world market made by means of rDNA. Despite important advances in rDNA applications in mammalian cells, yeasts still represent attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review we summarize advantages and limitations of the main and most promising yeast hosts.

Index Entries

Yeastsheterologous proteinsexpressionindustrial biotechnology

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2005