Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology

, Volume 84, Issue 1, pp 693–705

Steam pretreatment of douglas-fir wood chips

Can conditions for optimum hemicellulose recovery still provide adequate access for efficient enzymatic hydrolysis?
  • Abdel-Latif Boussaid
  • Ali R. Esteghlalian
  • David J. Gregg
  • Keun Ho Lee
  • John N. Saddler
Article

DOI: 10.1385/ABAB:84-86:1-9:693

Cite this article as:
Boussaid, AL., Esteghlalian, A.R., Gregg, D.J. et al. Appl Biochem Biotechnol (2000) 84: 693. doi:10.1385/ABAB:84-86:1-9:693

Abstract

Douglas-fir sapwood and heartwood were impregnated with SO2 and steam exploded at three severity levels, and the cellulose-rich, water-insoluble component was enzymatically hydrolyzed. The high-severity conditions resulted in near complete solubilization and some degradation of hemicelluloses and a significant improvement in the efficiency of enzymatic digestibility of the cell ulose component. At lower severity, some of the hemicellulose remained un hydrolyzed, and the cellulose present in the pretreated solids was not readily hydrolyzed. The medium-severity pretreatment conditions proved to be a good compromise because they improved the enzymatic hydrolyzability of the solids and resulted in the recovery of the majority of hemicellulose in a monomeric form within the water-soluble stream. Sapwood-derived wood chips exhibited a higher susceptibility to both pretreatment and hydrolysis and, on steam explosion, formed smaller particles as compared to heartwood-derived wood chips.

Index Entries

Douglas firsapwoodheartwoodsteam explosionenzymatic hydrolysisfiber coarsenessparticle size distribution

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abdel-Latif Boussaid
    • 1
  • Ali R. Esteghlalian
    • 1
  • David J. Gregg
    • 1
  • Keun Ho Lee
    • 1
  • John N. Saddler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Wood Science, Chair of Forest Products Biotechnology, Forest Sciences CenterThe University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada