Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 19, Issue 13, pp 4078–4084

Fear of Cancer Recurrence after Curative Pancreatectomy: A Cross-sectional Study in Survivors of Pancreatic and Periampullary Tumors

  • Maria Q. B. Petzel
  • Nathan H. Parker
  • Alan D. Valentine
  • Sébastien Simard
  • Graciela M. Nogueras-Gonzalez
  • Jeffrey E. Lee
  • Peter W. T. Pisters
  • Jean-Nicolas Vauthey
  • Jason B. Fleming
  • Matthew H. G. Katz
Pancreatic Tumors

DOI: 10.1245/s10434-012-2566-1

Cite this article as:
Petzel, M.Q.B., Parker, N.H., Valentine, A.D. et al. Ann Surg Oncol (2012) 19: 4078. doi:10.1245/s10434-012-2566-1

Abstract

Background

Fear of disease recurrence is well documented among cancer survivors, but its significance among patients treated for solid pancreatic and periampullary neoplasms is unknown despite the known risk of recurrence associated with these tumors. We hypothesized that fear of cancer recurrence (FCR) represents a common source of psychosocial distress in this population and sought to characterize subgroups for whom FCR might represent a target for intervention to improve quality of life.

Methods

We conducted a cross-sectional study of FCR in patients who were disease-free after potentially curative pancreatectomy for ductal or periampullary adenocarcinoma or pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. We assessed seven discrete dimensions of FCR using the Fear of Recurrence Inventory and evaluated quality of life and psychosocial distress using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

Results

Of 354 eligible patients, 240 (68 %) participated in the study a median of 48 months after potentially curative pancreatectomy. An FCR severity score indicative of frequent fearful thoughts, emotional disturbance and functional impairment was identified in 37, 28, and 35 % of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, nonpancreatic periampullary adenocarcinoma, and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, respectively. Anxiety (P < 0.001) and low quality of life (P = 0.028) were independently associated with a clinically significant level of FCR, but histopathologic diagnosis and clinicopathologic markers of prognosis were not.

Conclusions

FCR represents a significant concern for one-third of patients after curative surgery for a pancreatic or periampullary tumor, regardless of their actual likelihood of recurrence or disease-related death.

Supplementary material

10434_2012_2566_MOESM1_ESM.docx (15 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 14 kb)

Copyright information

© Society of Surgical Oncology 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Q. B. Petzel
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nathan H. Parker
    • 1
  • Alan D. Valentine
    • 3
  • Sébastien Simard
    • 4
  • Graciela M. Nogueras-Gonzalez
    • 5
  • Jeffrey E. Lee
    • 1
  • Peter W. T. Pisters
    • 1
  • Jean-Nicolas Vauthey
    • 1
  • Jason B. Fleming
    • 1
  • Matthew H. G. Katz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgical OncologyThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Clinical NutritionThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  4. 4.Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de QuébecUniversité LavalQuebecCanada
  5. 5.Department of BiostatisticsThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations