Gynecologic Oncology

Annals of Surgical Oncology

, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 948-958

First online:

Influence of Surgical Volume on Outcome for Laparoscopic Hysterectomy for Endometrial Cancer

  • Jason D. WrightAffiliated withDivision of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsHerbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center Email author 
  • , Dawn L. HershmanAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsDepartment of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia UniversityHerbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • , William M. BurkeAffiliated withDivision of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • , Yu-Shiang LuAffiliated withDivision of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • , Alfred I. NeugutAffiliated withDepartment of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsDepartment of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia UniversityHerbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • , Sharyn N. LewinAffiliated withDivision of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsHerbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • , Thomas J. HerzogAffiliated withDivision of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsHerbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center

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Abstract

Purpose

The volume of surgical procedures performed by hospitals and surgeons has a strong influence on outcomes for a number of surgeries. We examined the influence of surgeon and hospital case volume on morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization for women with endometrial cancer undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy.

Methods

Perspective, a nationwide inpatient database developed to measure utilization and quality, was used to examine women with endometrial cancer who underwent laparoscopic hysterectomy with or without lymphadenectomy from 2000 to 2010. Perioperative morbidity, mortality, and cost were compared using Chi-square tests and multivariable generalized estimating equations.

Results

A total of 4,137 patients were identified. The overall complication rate was 9.8% for low-volume vs. 10.4% for high-volume surgeons [multivariable odds ratio (OR) = 0.71; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.41–1.22]. The rates of intraoperative complications, surgical-site complications, medical complications, transfusion, and reoperation were similar for patients treated by low- and high-volume surgeons (p > 0.05 for all). The adjusted estimate for hospital cost for patients treated by high- compared with low-volume surgeons was 219 USD (95% CI, −790 to 1,228 USD). The odds ratio for any complication in high- compared with low-volume hospitals was 1.24 (95% CI, 0.78–1.96). The average cost for patients treated in high- compared with low-volume facilities was −815 USD (95% CI, −1,641 to 11 USD). Neither physician nor hospital volume had a statistically significant effect on perioperative mortality.

Conclusion

Laparoscopic hysterectomy for endometrial cancer is well tolerated and associated with an acceptable morbidity profile. Surgeon and hospital volume appear to have little effect on perioperative morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization.